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Fall Sports – Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen While Watching or Playing

Most people remember to use sunscreen in the summer – when you’re going to be spending hours in the hot sun watching baseball games or soccer, or biking, running, or participating in different physical activities, it’s easy. Once fall comes around, you may be less vigilant about keeping your sunblock container nearby. But just because the sunniest season of the year is over, it doesn’t mean you can stop wearing sunscreen to protect your skin.

Fall Sports - Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen

Photo Credit: Torsten Bolten

Weather Changes

It’s true that once the seasons turn, you’ll experience cloudier days and lower temperatures that won’t tempt you to be outside quite so often. But the truth is, the ultraviolet rays that can cause skin cancer are unaffected by year-round weather changes, and remain present and potent on cloudy days. In addition, there are conditions that takes place in the fall that may actually lead to an increase in your chances of getting a burn. For example, nice and snow are reflective and can bounce UV rays back at you.

Sporting Events

Fall sports such as football, baseball, soccer, tennis, field hockey, volleyball, and cross-country require you to be outdoors, sometimes for lengthy periods of time, whether you’re watching or playing. And there’s no guarantee that you’ll have shade to shield you from the damaging rays of the sun. You may have to dress warmly for some of these games, but the sun is no less dangerous. Other sports, such as skiing and snowboarding, can offer additional concern because the sun rays may be damaging at higher altitudes – and snow and ice are often a factor there.

The Importance of Sun Safety

The UV rays that may damage your skin cells are UVA and UVB rays. UVB rays are the ones that lead to sunburn; you may not feel any of the symptoms of UVA exposure until your skin starts to show wrinkles and dark spots. You need to protect from both types of UV rays with a water-resistant, broad spectrum sunblock because your lifetime exposure to the sun determines whether you’re at risk for skin cancer, so reduce your exposure as much as possible. Avoid sunburns, because that increases your risk immensely. Stay in the shade and cover up if that’s possible.

The bottom line is, you must protect yourself from the sun not just in the summer, but all year round. You’ll still see quite a bit of sun in the fall, and you may still be out and about for long periods if you’re playing or watching sports. Be smart and keep that sunblock, such as SolRx SPF 44 Dry Zinc Sunscreen, on hand, even if it looks dreary out there.

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