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SolRx Sunscreen Blog

Is Exercising Outdoors Better for Your Health?

outdoor exercise better for healthIt’s the start of Summer here at SolRx. And while it may seem inviting to take our workouts outdoors, the intensity of the sun can be an adversarial element that makes indoor exercise more inviting.

Combined with energy-zapping heat, dense city smog, and an increased concern about carbon emissions, it can seem like a safe alternative to hop on the treadmill or jump in the pool. But at the end of the day, is indoor exercise actually better for one’s health?

In short, no. No it is not. There have been a number of studies that show exercising outdoors is actually better for your health. Combined with our passion in keeping you protected from the sun’s harmful rays, below we shed light on why outdoor exercise is better for your health.

Outdoor Exercise for Emotional & Mental Health

While it may seem obvious that outdoor exercise improves physical health, studies have shown that getting outside can also boost mental and emotional health. In fact, a study led by scientists at Stanford revealed quantifiable evidence that walking in nature could lead to a lower risk of depression.Outdoor Hike

The study discovered that people who went for a 90 minute walk in a natural outdoor setting (as opposed to those who walked in a high-traffic urban environment) showed significantly lower activity in a region of the brain associated with a key factor in depression.

According to Gregory Bratman of Stanford, more than half of the world’s population lives in urban settings, and that’s forecasted to rise to 70 percent within a few decades. Just as urbanization and disconnection from nature have grown dramatically, so have mental disorders such as depression. In turn, taking a hike may be the best prescription for depression.

Mood-Boosting Benefits of Sun Exposure

In addition to the physical and emotional benefits of exercising in nature, individuals can also experience a dramatic boost in mood by getting outside on sunny days. Sun exposure is one of the most potent ways in which we absorb vitamin D, which is vital for both physical and mental health. 

Studies have shown that exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet light triggers the production of serotonin, a hormone that lifts mood. Low serotonin is associated with depression – particularly seasonal affective disorder (a form of depression that’s often experienced during the winter months when there is less sunlight.) The same lull feelings from a lack of sunlight may occur in individuals who are constantly cooped-up indoors.

Enjoying the benefits of exercise and recreation means getting outside and active, but also feeling the mood-boosting effects that stem from exposure to sunlight. Just remember to use a broad-spectrum sport sunscreen to ensure you stay protected.

Exercising Outdoors to Combat Mesothelioma & Cancer

Mesothelioma is a devastating and incurable form of cancer. For patients diagnosed with mesothelioma it means facing mortality, in addition to adapting to changes in one’s physical abilities, relationships, and overall self-sustainability.

According to an article at Mesothelioma.net, “all of this comes together to reduce a cancer patient’s quality of life and this can have a big impact on mental health. Cancer patients are at an increased risk for developing depression and anxiety and for experiencing stress, fear, and other negative emotions on a regular basis. It is important to be aware of this risk and to notice the signs of depression, either in yourself or a loved one, so you can get help and treatment.”

From medications to therapy, there are a number of tools to help fight the battle against cancer and seek relief from depression. However one of the most accessible and powerful strategies is to stay active outdoors and feel the effects of natural sunlight.

In any event, exercising outdoors is often better for your health than staying inside. Going back to nature, getting healthy exposure from the sun, and putting your body in motion can be the best form of therapy available. Just be conscious of the harmful risks at play when stepping out in the intense summer sun, and choose the right type of sunscreen to ensure you’re protected from both UVA and UVB rays.

Image by Sport Box

Summer 2017 Events

With June already in sight, SolRx is gearing up to kick off the summer season with a couple big events on the calendar. From long-distance swim races to water and beach courses, SolRx is helping its athletes (and customers) stay protected from the intense summer sun while competing in upcoming events.

Summer 2017 Events

41st Annual Swim Around Key West

With the first wave starting at 7:15 am on June 24, the Swim Around Key West is all day endeavor that involves a 12.5-mile clockwise loop around the island. For swimmers completing the distance solo, the race can involve up to 8 hours of sun exposure intensified by water immersion. Fortunately, there are a couple areas where swimmers can benefit from the tides. For more info, visit SwimAroundKeyWest.com.

Find SolRx in Key West

If you’re planning to be in Key West during the 41st Annual Swim Around Key West, you can find SolRx at the Southernmost Beach Resort and Tortuga Sailing Adventures.

2017 USLA National Lifeguard Championship

Kicking off August 9th in Daytona Beach, Florida, the 2017 USLA National Lifeguard Championships will put some of the nation’s top life guards to the test. Professional Lifeguards ranging from ages 16 to 80 and Junior Lifeguards from ages 9 to 15 will compete in myriad of events that challenge their lifesaving skills.

The water and beach course events range from surf swims to beach runs, to navigating paddleboards and surf boats. A few of the highlights include the Landline Rescue Relay, Ironman and Ironwoman events, Beach Flags and the 4×100 relay, a shuttle-run-style competition that is called “the fastest event on sand.”

For more info, visit USLA.org.

Image by Cody Ryan Reigle

UVA vs UVB Rays: What is the Difference?

What’s the difference UVA vs UVB rays? It’s an important question that doesn’t always get the attention that it deserves. So to get to the bottom of it, let’s define exactly what these rays mean.

UVA vs UVB Rays What's the Difference

The level of sunlight that reaches the earth’s surface is composed of two primary types of rays, both of which are harmful to the skin: Long Wave Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Short Wave Ultraviolet B (UVB). Unlike UVB rays, UVA rays penetrate deep into the skin’s thickest layer otherwise known as the dermis. However, both UVA and UVB rays can pose potential issues with unprotected exposure.

To further underscore the difference between UVA vs UVB rays, below we explain what each of these types mean and how you can minimize their effects.

What is UVB?

As the primary culprit of sunburn and skin reddening, UVB rays are responsible for damaging the more superficial epidermal layers of the skin. UVB rays contribute to the development of skin cancer and photoaging (wrinkling). And contrary to popular belief, UVB rays do not significantly penetrate glass.

The intensity of UVB varies by location, season, and time of day. Between 10 AM and 4 PM from April to October are the most potent levels of which UVB hits the U.S. However, UVB rays can still burn and damage skin year-round. This is particularly common at high altitudes or against reflective conditions such as snow and ice. Against these conditions, UVB can reflect up to 80 percent of the rays. As a result, they can make contact with skin twice.

What is UVA?

Unlike UVB rays, UVA are present with relatively equal intensity throughout all daylight hours during the year. They can also penetrate glass and clouds. UVA rays make up 95 percent of the UV radiation that reaches the our planet’s surface. Although these rays are less intense compared to UVB, UVA rays are 30 to 50 times more prevalent.

UVA penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB and are considered to play a major role in skin aging and photoaging. Until recently, most scientists were under the belief that UVA rays did not cause significant damage in areas of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin.). However, over the years studies have shown that UVA rays damage skin cells in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. As a result, UVA exposure can contribute to and may even initiate the occurrence of skin cancers.

Minimizing the Deleterious Effects of UVA & UVB Rays

For active lifestyles, avoiding sun exposure in its entirety is not always an option. However, you can minimize the deleterious effects of UVA and UVB by following these guidelines:

  • Seek shade whenever possible, especially between the peak hours of the sun (10 AM and 4 PM.)
  • Do not let your skin burn. When the skin turns pink, take this as a sign that your skin is starting to burn.
  • Avoid artificial tanning, such as UV tanning booths.
  • Cover up with clothing, including a brimmed hat and polarized sunglasses.
  • Apply a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least a SPF of 15 before going outdoors. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher (such as SolRx’ Zinc Sunscreen Stick for Face.)
  • Keep newborns and young children out of the sun. Sunscreens should be used on babies over the age of six months.
  • Take time every month to examine your skin from head-to-toe.

At SolRx, the best line of defense against both UVA and UVB rays is a broad spectrum sunscreen. We’ve formulated many different products that provide this protection under some of the most extreme conditions, including 8 hours of water immersion and high-altitude, snowy conditions. See what’s in store and shop SolRx sunscreens to ensure you’re protected against both UVA and UVB.

 

Image by Hazar Shok

Endless Summer: Some Hot Spots That Are Still Hot

Most of the country is no longer experiencing the heat of summer, but there are places within this country that are still warm, breezy, and beautiful. If you’re missing the sun and need to channel some warm weather, try these vacation spots – there’s one close to you!

endless summer

Key West, Florida – The sunsets from Key West are second to none, and the laid-back lifestyle will draw you in. Even the drive from Miami is relaxing. Because of the coral reefs certain watersports aren’t available – but restful yet stimulating beach fun is always de rigueur.

Topsail Beach, North Carolina – This area offers a friendly and family-oriented style of beach living, complete with surfing, boating, fishing, and sunset cruising. Recreation in the form of shops and restaurants, a skating rink, and other small-town amusements abound.

San Diego, California – From beach resorts to SeaWorld and Legoland and an incredible zoo, San Diego is always a hot destination. Enjoy amazing vistas, culture, hiking spots, and more along the Pacific coast. For family fun and sun, this is the place!

San Francisco, California – If you enjoy more urban environments, northern California might be your cup of tea. There are plenty of natural wonders here too. Go hiking nearby in Big Sur or Muir Woods, then enjoy some excellent meals and ocean views.

Savannah, Georgia – Steeped in history, Savannah is a beautiful and atmospheric town on the Atlantic, full of southern-style hospitality, cultural touchpoints, and maybe a ghost or two. Tybee Island nearby is a gorgeous spot for visiting the beach.

Florida KeysHawaii – Pretty much the whole state of Hawaii, consisting of eight main islands, is worth seeing for its natural beauty and sun-drenched beaches. Hike along a volcano on the Big Island, revel in the thriving nightlife of Honolulu, or visit the quieter beaches of Kauai.

South Padre Island, Texas – A popular spring break spot, South Padre Island is an active community where you can enjoy watersports, fishing, spas, and bars and nightclubs. Mild weather and calm waters can be enjoyed all year.

New Orleans, Louisiana – It’s not just for Mardi Gras – New Orleans is a city that embraces its French heritage and its unique southern mystique simultaneously. You can visit a swamp, immerse yourself in the rich history of the region, and enjoy the culture.

Phoenix, Arizona – Arizona has the Grand Canyon and Monument Valley, but for a bit of civilization, Phoenix is perfect. With bustling downtown areas, great shopping and golfing, and spring training, it’s a great place to enjoy the warmth anytime of year!

Las Vegas, Nevada – It’s always easy to find your way to Vegas, where blockbuster live shows, great dining, and monumentally scaled casinos appeal to a diverse international audience. Not far way, you can get away from the glitz and glam with Nevada’s natural beauty.

We know you haven’t explored all the places you want to go yet, so why not escape the coming cold seasons (brr) and find a new place to go? Our country boasts such a variety of summery destinations, you’re sure to find one that has everything you want. While you’re out exploring your destination of choice, don’t forget to lather up with sunscreen by SolRx!

 

Image credit: Carlos Molina

Fall Sports – Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen While Watching or Playing

Most people remember to use sunscreen in the summer – when you’re going to be spending hours in the hot sun watching baseball games or soccer, or biking, running, or participating in different physical activities, it’s easy. Once fall comes around, you may be less vigilant about keeping your sunblock container nearby. But just because the sunniest season of the year is over, it doesn’t mean you can stop wearing sunscreen to protect your skin.

Fall Sports - Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen

Photo Credit: Torsten Bolten

Weather Changes

It’s true that once the seasons turn, you’ll experience cloudier days and lower temperatures that won’t tempt you to be outside quite so often. But the truth is, the ultraviolet rays that can cause skin cancer are unaffected by year-round weather changes, and remain present and potent on cloudy days. In addition, there are conditions that takes place in the fall that may actually lead to an increase in your chances of getting a burn. For example, nice and snow are reflective and can bounce UV rays back at you.

Sporting Events

Fall sports such as football, baseball, soccer, tennis, field hockey, volleyball, and cross-country require you to be outdoors, sometimes for lengthy periods of time, whether you’re watching or playing. And there’s no guarantee that you’ll have shade to shield you from the damaging rays of the sun. You may have to dress warmly for some of these games, but the sun is no less dangerous. Other sports, such as skiing and snowboarding, can offer additional concern because the sun rays may be damaging at higher altitudes – and snow and ice are often a factor there.

The Importance of Sun Safety

The UV rays that may damage your skin cells are UVA and UVB rays. UVB rays are the ones that lead to sunburn; you may not feel any of the symptoms of UVA exposure until your skin starts to show wrinkles and dark spots. You need to protect from both types of UV rays with a water-resistant, broad spectrum sunblock because your lifetime exposure to the sun determines whether you’re at risk for skin cancer, so reduce your exposure as much as possible. Avoid sunburns, because that increases your risk immensely. Stay in the shade and cover up if that’s possible.

The bottom line is, you must protect yourself from the sun not just in the summer, but all year round. You’ll still see quite a bit of sun in the fall, and you may still be out and about for long periods if you’re playing or watching sports. Be smart and keep that sunblock, such as SolRx SPF 44 Dry Zinc Sunscreen, on hand, even if it looks dreary out there.

Running Outside: Tips and Tricks

This time of year, everyone loves being outside taking advantage of the weather. If you, too, wish to exercise outdoors, it’s a great feeling! But make sure you are making the transition from indoor running to outdoor running in a positive, fun, and safe way. SolRx Sport Sunscreen for Running Outside

1. Set Your Own Pace

If you run on a treadmill, your machine sets your pace for you. If you run on an indoor track, you have certain points of reference for knowing how fast and how far you’re going. Outside, you’ll have to find out for yourself what pace is best, and you’ll have to map out your own route to determine your distance. Start slow, and realize that running on sidewalk and roads is very different from running on indoor surfaces. This has impacts on your gait and your muscles. Running outside can be harder, but it may also be also easier to find your flow.

2. Be Cautious

Outside, you’ll have distractions and obstacles you didn’t face when you were running indoors. Streetlights will make you stop for oncoming traffic. Crossing railroad tracks will make you change your speed. There will be hills you didn’t expect, because you don’t even notice them when you drive that route. Bikers will want to pass you. Stay alert, obey traffic signals, and if you’re listening to music, don’t make it so loud you can’t hear what’s happening around you.

3. Dress for the Weather

Despite the season, you’ll experience changes in the weather that will affect your run, whether this means humidity, heat, rain, wind, or cold. Take note of what is going on outside! If it’s sunny out, use sunblock. If it’s hot, wear wicking clothing that will get the sweat away from you. If it’s raining, you may wish to wear something waterproof – but note that waterproof gear is often not breathable. If it’s cold, put on running tights. If it’s allergy season, run in the mornings when there’s less pollen. And make sure you have great shoes.

4. Find A Friend

Running with someone makes the time go much faster. Also, if you still have enough breath to talk as you’re running, you’ll know that you’re not overdoing it. Running the course with someone else also challenges the both of you to be better, and will encourage both of you to keep good practices in mind, such as stretching before and after. You could also join a running club, which usually includes runners at all levels, to get to know others who may have similar experiences and goals to yours.

5. Make Goals and Chart Your Progress

No matter what your goals are – losing weight, feeling stronger, getting ready for a race – you should keep track of how you’re doing. It’ll motivate you, and if you’re having trouble, it’ll help you figure out what’s holding you up. You can also use apps, journals and other tools to map your route, monitor heart rate, and chart your progress.

Running outside can be a pleasant way to get your daily exercise, but there is a bit of a learning curve. Make sure you’re eating right and toning the top part of your body as well as the bottom. Keep hydrated and use a good sunscreen such as SolRx with WATERBLOCK technology. Remember to reward yourself for your successes. But it’s a lot of fun, so go to it!

Back to School – Is Sunblock on Your Kid’s School Supply List?

Is Sunblock on Your Kid’s School Supply List?

Photo Credit: Leon Weber

Believe it or not, summer’s almost over. This means it’s time to buy fall clothes and shop for items on your school supply list – pencils, tissues, markers, glue. Is sunblock included? 

Well, it might not be. These days, many school lists are geared to the general student population, as kids often share their supplies with one another, and sunblock is usually a more personal choice. In addition, it’s not really a direct educational aid. But it’s still something you should send to school with your students, and make sure they have on hand.

The Importance of Sunblock

You certainly understand why you have sunblock on hand throughout June, July, and August. The sun is strong, and your kids are hopefully spending a lot of time outdoors. They need protection from those UVA and UVB rays, the ones that create sunburn and age skin prematurely, making them at risk for skin cancer later in life. It’s hot, so they may sweat, which means a water-resistant formula would be best to protect their more sensitive skin. Remember that any amount of tanning on your child’s skin can represent cellular skin damage, so protecting them from the sun is key.

School Days

It’s easy to forget that your kids will be outside and exposed to the weather on school days. After all, you don’t see them, and you have other things on your mind – work, taking care of other children, home projects, classes. But they will have recess, and they may eat lunch outside (depending on your climate and school’s situation), and the walk or bike to and from school may also take them along sunlit sidewalks and open areas with little shade. They may spend time outside during gym classes, waiting for the bus, and on field days as well. The SolRx SPF 35 Sunscreen comes in a 1.5oz bottle with a carabiner handle for easy access.

Unseen Dangers

Putting sunblock on can be a hassle, especially when it comes to squirming children. But it’s important, if your kids will be outside, to make sure they are always wearing sunscreen, and try to encourage them to reapply during the day (we know this is hard!). Even in winter, and on cloudy days, the sun can be dangerous. The sun’s rays can sometimes penetrate through clouds quite well, depending on their type, thickness, and deepness through the atmosphere, and the UV effect can be even stronger on the earth’s surface as a result. In the winter, UV rays reflect off snow and ice and bounce right back onto skin, so the sun can affect your children more than you realize all year round – no matter what the weather conditions.

We can’t control every moment of our children’s days once they enter school, but we can give them the tools to help themselves. That’s really what education is all about, right? Although your school supply list might not include sunblock, you should slip a container into your kids’ backpacks and make sure they’re truly ready for school this fall – in all the important ways.

Some Mistakes People Always Make When Applying Sunscreen

Think you’re well protected from the sun this summer? You might be making one of the following mistakes when applying sunscreen, which could harm your skin and your health down the line.

1. You Wait Too Long to Apply It

Mistakes People Always Make When Applying SunscreenIf you want till you get outside to apply sunscreen, you’re too late. You should apply at least 20 minutes before you actually go into the sun, in order to make sure your sunblock has time to get absorbed into your skin and start working. Your skin is vulnerable when you first go into the sun, so this is important. Although the FDA warns that you need to reapply every 80 minutes (and you do with other sunscreens), SolRx is has been tested and proven to offer coverage for 8 hours in and out of water.

2. You Miss A Spot

If you try to apply sunscreen while your clothes are on, you’re likely to miss spots because you don’t want to get your clothes messy, so you should actually make sure you use a liberal amount before you leave the house. Don’t forget your lips, your underarms, your feet, behind your ears, and the back of your neck. Also, protect your eyes with sunglasses.

3. You Don’t Use the Right Kind

You need a high-SPF (15+), broad-spectrum sunblock, which protects from both UVA and UVB rays, and if you’re going to sweat or go into the water, you need to use a water-resistant formula so your sunblock will not slide off and become ineffective. Don’t use body-only formulations on your face, because formulas designed for your face are more gently manufactured without alcohol.

4. You Don’t Use It When You Should

It doesn’t have to be glaringly sunny outside for you to put sunblock on. During certain times of day, the sun can be quite strong even through clouds. Windows of houses and cars block UVB rays but not UVA – and you won’t be able to tell that you’re getting them, because only UVB rays lead to darkened skin. You can also still get sun when you’re in the shade, under an umbrella, because sun rays reflect off sand, water, and snow.

5. You Don’t Use Enough

Most people only apply about 25-50 percent of the amount of sunscreen they really need. You should be using about one shot glass’ worth of sunblock (two tablespoons) to exposed areas, with a nickel-sized dollop for the face alone. With a spray, apply until there’s an even sheen on the skin. Please note, it’s very unlikely that you will ever apply too much.

These are incredibly common mistakes that most people experience more than once when putting on sunblock, but easily fixed with a little time and extra care when you apply. Safeguard yourself and those you love by eliminating these mistakes, and you’ll be able to enjoy summer with no drawbacks!

Applying Spray-On Sunscreen: SolRx Spray Sunscreens

Spray-on sunscreens can be just as effective as lotions and creams, as long as you put enough on. But how exactly should you use spray-on sunscreens to get the best effect?

As one of the leading developers of high-performance spray-on sunscreen, here at SolRx, we’ve created an advanced option that designed to offer prolonged water immersion, profuse sweating, and long hours in the sun. As such, below we discuss the important of proper application of spray-on sunscreens. 

Spray On Sunscreen

Spray sunscreens are ideal for athletes of all types, especially when sweating is inevitable.

Why Use A Spray-on Sunscreen?

SPF 50 Spray On Sunscreen

SolRx SPF 50 Spray Sunscreen with WaterBlock

Spray-on sunscreen has been the number one choice for many people because it dries quickly, it’s lightweight and it’s easy to put on. It’ll protect areas that are hard to cover otherwise, like your scalp, if you don’t want to wear a hat, or your back. In addition, people who are hairy may prefer spray-on’s because they don’t tend to cling to hairs the way lotions do.

The SolRx SPF 50 Spray Sunscreen Pump is an excellent choice for spray sunscreen. The formula is engineered with natural ingredients to keep your skin from drying out. The WATERBLOCK formula (which is 100% paraben-free, non-sticky) and has been proven to provide 480 minutes of protection in and out of the water!

Yes, you read that correctly. That’s a spray-on sunscreen that provides 8+ hours of protection!

Make Sure You’re Putting Enough On

A gentle spritz onto your skin isn’t enough. You need to apply enough to the skin to make it glisten. A good general rule is to aim your spray continuously for about six seconds per body part – which is longer than you might think. Don’t rush this process; it’ll still be quick, but you need to make sure you’re thorough.

Do I Really Have to Rub Spray Sunscreen In?

The short answer is yes. No matter whether the instructions call for it or not, you should rub your spray-on sunscreen in. This is because even fine sprays will coat your body unevenly, and rubbing it in ensures that you get more even coverage. Rubbing also helps your body absorb the sunscreen more easily. Make sure that you don’t rub too vigorously, because this may actually reduce the effectiveness of your sunscreen.

Ultimately, you should get the type of sunscreen that you’ll actually use. If you think you won’t use lotions because you (or your squirming child) aren’t patient enough to put it all over your body, then a spray-on might be the best option for you.

Our Favorite Golf Courses & No. 1 Golf Tip

Our great nation boasts hundreds of beautiful, challenging, interesting golf courses, but here are a few of the ones we like best. golf sunscreen

Augusta National – Augusta, Georgia

This club is one of the most famous in the world for a reason. Augusta is a classic course, where plenty of changes over the years have led to a competitive course featuring a fusion of design ideas.

Cypress Point Club – Pebble Beach, California

This golfing masterpiece on Pebble Beach, with its cypress trees, sand dunes, and oceanside location, is a pristine course with a beautiful view. It’s also very exclusive, with a layout designed for experts.

Pine Valley Golf Club – Pine Valley, New Jersey

Set in a challenging landscape, the courses here require a consistent and thoughtful level of play. It’s tough, but world-class, and many consider it one of the finest places for numerous aspects of the game.

National Golf Links of America – Southampton, New York

Considered very exclusive, this course is a links-style site over 250 acres of gently rolling land, with many holes patterned after famous courses in the British isles, and some outstanding original holes as well.

The Country Club – Brookline, Mass.

Of great historical importance, this club is one of the charter clubs that founded the United States Golf Association. It features a beautiful clubhouse, well-varied routing, hilly terrain, smallish greens, and long-held traditions.

Seminole Golf Club – Juno Beach, Florida

Considered a lesser-known club, this is an ultra-exclusive course with great locker rooms, a fast pace, a good variety of holes each of which is influenced differently by wind, and challenging play. Accuracy and good length are required.

Liberty National Golf Club – Jersey City, New Jersey

This Scottish links-inspired club’s uniqueness stems in part from its location, close to Manhattan Island – it offers a view of the Statue of Liberty. This is a 7,400-yard course that has made extensive improvements to become the best.

Pinehurst Resort – Pinehurst, North Carolina

Designed by various architects to elevate a historic legacy, this course in the middle of a golf mecca makes use of curved terrain to challenge golfers with small and fast greens, along with delicate approaches that demand precision.

Shinnecock Hills Golf Club – Southampton, New York

One of the earliest formalized golf clubs in America, this is a links-style golf club full of legends. Its well-groomed fairways and greens offer difficult play through native grasses, often heavy winds, and some of the greatest holes in the game.

Winged Foot Golf Club – Mamaroneck, New York

The two golf courses here are strong and brilliant, with much character and hazards that each serve a tactical purpose. This is hallowed ground, and people who’ve played here cite knowledgeable staff and fantastic layout as pluses here.

Over the years, you’ll hear plenty of advice on how to play the game, and you’re your own worst critic. So now, our #1 Golf Tip: Don’t put so much pressure on one shot. Golf is sometimes a game of misses, and you may tend to overthink each one. Don’t worry about it so much, and remember practice will help you develop confidence and experience.

This summer, try SolRx SPF 50 WATERBLOCK Spray Sunscreen Pump, it’s dry finish formula is loved by golfers because their hands don’t slip in the grip.

Enjoy the game!