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SolRx Sunscreen Blog

Fall Sports – Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen While Watching or Playing

Most people remember to use sunscreen in the summer – when you’re going to be spending hours in the hot sun watching baseball games or soccer, or biking, running, or participating in different physical activities, it’s easy. Once fall comes around, you may be less vigilant about keeping your sunblock container nearby. But just because the sunniest season of the year is over, it doesn’t mean you can stop wearing sunscreen to protect your skin.

Fall Sports - Make Sure to Wear Sunscreen

Photo Credit: Torsten Bolten

Weather Changes

It’s true that once the seasons turn, you’ll experience cloudier days and lower temperatures that won’t tempt you to be outside quite so often. But the truth is, the ultraviolet rays that can cause skin cancer are unaffected by year-round weather changes, and remain present and potent on cloudy days. In addition, there are conditions that takes place in the fall that may actually lead to an increase in your chances of getting a burn. For example, nice and snow are reflective and can bounce UV rays back at you.

Sporting Events

Fall sports such as football, baseball, soccer, tennis, field hockey, volleyball, and cross-country require you to be outdoors, sometimes for lengthy periods of time, whether you’re watching or playing. And there’s no guarantee that you’ll have shade to shield you from the damaging rays of the sun. You may have to dress warmly for some of these games, but the sun is no less dangerous. Other sports, such as skiing and snowboarding, can offer additional concern because the sun rays may be damaging at higher altitudes – and snow and ice are often a factor there.

The Importance of Sun Safety

The UV rays that may damage your skin cells are UVA and UVB rays. UVB rays are the ones that lead to sunburn; you may not feel any of the symptoms of UVA exposure until your skin starts to show wrinkles and dark spots. You need to protect from both types of UV rays with a water-resistant, broad spectrum sunblock because your lifetime exposure to the sun determines whether you’re at risk for skin cancer, so reduce your exposure as much as possible. Avoid sunburns, because that increases your risk immensely. Stay in the shade and cover up if that’s possible.

The bottom line is, you must protect yourself from the sun not just in the summer, but all year round. You’ll still see quite a bit of sun in the fall, and you may still be out and about for long periods if you’re playing or watching sports. Be smart and keep that sunblock, such as SolRx SPF 44 Dry Zinc Sunscreen, on hand, even if it looks dreary out there.

Back to School – Is Sunblock on Your Kid’s School Supply List?

Is Sunblock on Your Kid’s School Supply List?

Photo Credit: Leon Weber

Believe it or not, summer’s almost over. This means it’s time to buy fall clothes and shop for items on your school supply list – pencils, tissues, markers, glue. Is sunblock included? 

Well, it might not be. These days, many school lists are geared to the general student population, as kids often share their supplies with one another, and sunblock is usually a more personal choice. In addition, it’s not really a direct educational aid. But it’s still something you should send to school with your students, and make sure they have on hand.

The Importance of Sunblock

You certainly understand why you have sunblock on hand throughout June, July, and August. The sun is strong, and your kids are hopefully spending a lot of time outdoors. They need protection from those UVA and UVB rays, the ones that create sunburn and age skin prematurely, making them at risk for skin cancer later in life. It’s hot, so they may sweat, which means a water-resistant formula would be best to protect their more sensitive skin. Remember that any amount of tanning on your child’s skin can represent cellular skin damage, so protecting them from the sun is key.

School Days

It’s easy to forget that your kids will be outside and exposed to the weather on school days. After all, you don’t see them, and you have other things on your mind – work, taking care of other children, home projects, classes. But they will have recess, and they may eat lunch outside (depending on your climate and school’s situation), and the walk or bike to and from school may also take them along sunlit sidewalks and open areas with little shade. They may spend time outside during gym classes, waiting for the bus, and on field days as well. The SolRx SPF 35 Sunscreen comes in a 1.5oz bottle with a carabiner handle for easy access.

Unseen Dangers

Putting sunblock on can be a hassle, especially when it comes to squirming children. But it’s important, if your kids will be outside, to make sure they are always wearing sunscreen, and try to encourage them to reapply during the day (we know this is hard!). Even in winter, and on cloudy days, the sun can be dangerous. The sun’s rays can sometimes penetrate through clouds quite well, depending on their type, thickness, and deepness through the atmosphere, and the UV effect can be even stronger on the earth’s surface as a result. In the winter, UV rays reflect off snow and ice and bounce right back onto skin, so the sun can affect your children more than you realize all year round – no matter what the weather conditions.

We can’t control every moment of our children’s days once they enter school, but we can give them the tools to help themselves. That’s really what education is all about, right? Although your school supply list might not include sunblock, you should slip a container into your kids’ backpacks and make sure they’re truly ready for school this fall – in all the important ways.

Cycling: Pro Tips & Tricks

If you want to make the grade when it comes to cycling like a pro, follow these tips from experts in the know:

cycling sunscreen

Train Properly, and Pace Yourself

When you’re riding a big event, you can get caught up in the excitement and start too fast. Be careful not to expend your energy at the beginning of the ride. And remember it’s not all physical – there’s mental training to do as well. Know that you’ll experience emotional highs and lows during your ride, and the expectation will help you get through them.

Prepare for the Weather

If it rains, you’ll need a waterproof jacket. Use overshoes and waterproof socks, and consider gloves to keep your hands warm. Waterproof bib tights can also help during rain and cold. If you are riding in wintry conditions, boots and overtrousers may help. A hat or cap under your helmet can keep rain out and warm your noggin. And don’t forget that heat and sun can also provide less-than-optimal conditions. Wear a broad-spectrum water-resistant sunscreen and sunglasses for glare, such as SolRx with WATERBLOCK Technology.

Keep Your Bike Maintained and Adjusted

Make sure your bike is in tip-top shape. Use mudguards and lights if you’re riding in wet or dark conditions. Adjust your saddle to make sure it’s at the right height – if it is, your heel should just graze the pedal at the bottom of the pedal stroke. Make sure your wheels spin straight and don’t rub the brakes; use lube (but not too much) on the chain. Know how to change a flat.

Eat Well, Drink Water

If you’re in a race, don’t eat anything unusual on the day before the race. You don’t want to experiment just before an important event. Do make sure you have enough of the right nutrients and proteins to give you healthy energy for the race. Also, stay hydrated. If you’re using a water bottle during an event, keep your eyes on the road, and don’t drink as you go through potentially tricky areas.

Develop Your Technique

The idea is to look and feel at one with your bike. It’s best to keep yourself in good physical condition, which helps your steadiness during climbs, and to be confident in your bike-handling, which is important during descents. Make sure you can use your gears efficiently, so as not to lose momentum and energy. Anticipate. Stay loose, since this can help you lower your center of gravity during descents, and can keep your muscles from seizing up. If you practice regularly, your muscle memory will help make the process easier.

And, most of all, enjoy the ride! Cycling is a healthy physical activity that’s great for your legs while staying easy on your joints and feet. It’s a good way of experiencing the outdoors and getting to know a place, and the sense of freedom you experience is like no other.